Charging

Jnorris

New member
I have had my MG ZSEV for a week now and I am getting used to it. I have read many of the posts and found them really helpful. I need the updates as the bings and bongs are OTT for a newbie. I have used a few public chargers but if you could help by giving advice on max and min charge levels. Can I overcharge the car? If I leave the car on charge while I go shopping will it stop charging itself or should I stay in the car and monitor the level.
Also at what % will the car not start.
I love the car so smooth and a nice size and super quick 😄
Thanks in advance
 

Mgkev

Active member
Hi and welcome to our community. If you are really keen to learn about EV charging seek out Byorn Nyland on YouTube whom shows most EVs on charge and how each car behaves.
 

lee graham

Well-known member
I use rapid chargers almost exclusively and I try to keep my battery between 37% and 77%. The middle four lines on the battery gauge. I intend to slow charge to equalise once a month.

I wouldn’t worry about over charging or having a charging strategy. The battery is computer controlled and the car is designed for the masses. If the battery needs equalisation it will tell you.

As a general rule lithium based batteries don’t like two things, being completely discharged and being held at full charge. That can cause oxidation of the electrolyte resulting in loss of lithium ions which will in turn increase resistance.

Battery degradation is inevitable but I am not worried about it. As for what battery percentage and the car won’t start? Do you mean 12v or hvb?
 

KasEV

Active member
I use rapid chargers almost exclusively and I try to keep my battery between 37% and 77%. The middle four lines on the battery gauge. I intend to slow charge to equalise once a month.

I wouldn’t worry about over charging or having a charging strategy. The battery is computer controlled and the car is designed for the masses. If the battery needs equalisation it will tell you.

As a general rule lithium based batteries don’t like two things, being completely discharged and being held at full charge. That can cause oxidation of the electrolyte resulting in loss of lithium ions which will in turn increase resistance.

Battery degradation is inevitable but I am not worried about it. As for what battery percentage and the car won’t start? Do you mean 12v or hvb?
@Jnorris
Welcome to the group.
I will advise that you always do a bit of personal research on very question you ask so you are not derailed from acquiring true tech knowledge as unfortunately some members may dis-inform by passing on their personal preferences as if it were good practice.
Yes BMS does protect the battery but it is good to have a reasonable charging regime in place as well.
Unfortunately relying solely on "Rapid Chargers" is one of the "No! No!" of current EV charging recommendations. In fact most manufacturers will advise against that and the industry research data also shows that is bad. I am not 100% sure but I think apart from a few Tesla models and maybe Corsa / Polar star models all current EV batteries are not designed for persistent high load charging and will degrade significantly faster when charged in that manner.
Please see this summary below from electrek.co
In June 2018, Geotab acquired FleetCarma, a forerunner in providing technology support the use of EVs in fleets.

Here’s a quick rundown of what the data revealed:

  • If current degradation rates are maintained, the vast majority of batteries will outlast the usable life of the vehicle.
  • The average decline in energy storage is 2.3% per year. For a 150-mile EV, you’re likely to lose 17 miles of accessible range after five years.
  • EV batteries decline in a non-linear fashion. There’s an early drop, but the rate of decline slows down in subsequent years.
  • Liquid-cooled batteries decline slower than air-cooled packs. Geotab saw that a 2015 Tesla Model S with liquid cooling had an average annual degradation rate of 2.3%, compared to an air-cooled 2015 Nissan Leaf’s rate of 4.2%.
  • Battery-powered vehicles that have bigger state-of-charge buffers fare better. In other words, some carmakers use a smaller percentage of the battery’s capacity, which reduces usable range. But the conservative approach slows down the degradation rate, most notably in early versions of the Chevrolet Volt plug-in hybrid.
  • Higher vehicle use does not necessarily equal higher battery degradation.
  • Vehicles driven in hot temperatures show a faster decline in battery health.
  • The use of DC fast-chargers(rapid chargers) speeds up the process of degradation, but there’s not much difference in battery health based on frequent use of Level 1 versus Leve 2 charging. Losses that happen with frequent DC charging are made worse in hot climates.
For original article please visit
Please always look for and share good well sourced information.
 
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