MG5 Spare wheel kit

I've ordered a VW spacesaver I'm quite happy to use it as a slow get me home having not needed a spare for at least last 10 years and found that the compressor and glue stuff was useless! sods law now means I'll have a puncture!!!
 
This all sounds a lot more complicated than phoning the AA and have them fix your puncture or tow you to a tyre centre.
 
I total agree with you Alb £25000 ish to buy the car and wobbling about £250 for the correct and totally safe part to fit it in the woads of one Victor Meldrew
I DONT BELIEVE IT
I wonder would your insurance be valid if something went wrong while using the wrong one?
Les.
If the "something" could be attributed to using the incorrect part almost certainly not. Remember that in the case of an accident involving injury both the police AND the insurance company will examine the vehicle thoroughly.

Is the penny pinching really worth it?
 
Ordered the official space saver. Not worth the headache of tyre goo or waiting 5 hours for the AA to collect a single male occupant vehicle.

On numerous vehicles I've roadside/car park swapped a wheel then driven to a tyre shop for repair or replacement and been home in the warm and try before the AA man has even plugged your location into the sat nav.

My vehicle is my commuter mule, for £200ish it made complete sense to purchase a wheel. Why I would want to penny pinch on something I deem essential is beyond me.
 
If the "something" could be attributed to using the incorrect part almost certainly not. Remember that in the case of an accident involving injury both the police AND the insurance company will examine the vehicle thoroughly.

Is the penny pinching really worth it?
Hmm...You are absolutely right. Probably always best to go for the original dealer MG spacesaver. I have a Merc spare at present but will order up a pucker job asap.
 
Hmm...You are absolutely right. Probably always best to go for the original dealer MG spacesaver. I have a Merc spare at present but will order up a pucker job asap.
I am not personally a slave to always buying the manufacturer parts but there are some thing I don't thing worth risking for a few quid, even more so when it is a brand new vehicle.

For example take the spigot itself. some make the point that once fitted the bolts align the wheel and the spigot doesn't do much. I would defy anyone to know how much the spigot aids the strength in a knock on the wheel such as when driving through a pot hole. If it was only needed just to get the bolts in there would be no requirement for it to be manufactured to such tolerances that it is a tight fit in many cases.

The idea of a separate spigot ring adapter does not appeal at all.
 
Agreed. Spigot rings do not transfer any load. If they do it's minimal. They only help centre the wheel during installation. Many are plastic, but even the aluminium ones are relatively soft and not capable of transmitting any reasonable load into the hub. The wheel hub spigot is itself not actually that close a tolerance to the centrebore. It might really feel like it when you're trying, and cursing, to get the wheel on, but it's function is to prevent you from knackering the threads on the studs. From an engineering perspective it's actually a really sloppy fit. It's not even close to a press or interference fit as is the case for example with the hub bearing. So, no transverse loads are transferred through the hub spigot in normal conditions. There are tens of thousands of cars on the road using expensive aftermarket wheels with oversized CB supplied by the likes of Europarts, Halfords etc.. along with their spigot rings. So not illegal. Having said that, if I had aftermarket alloys with oversized centre bore I would make a point of declaring it to my insurance co. as a modification. To sum up, removal of doubt for the sake of a few quid is a good thing so best to go for the OEM spare. And as you say, in the event of a huge trauma to the road wheel, where one or more studs is not torqued properly ( and who really uses a torque wrench when changing wheels ), the wheel spigot could just be the last line of defence. I used to run an old Hundai Santa Fe and one day did'nt tighten up the bolts propertly. Heading down to Montrose I felt and hear a clattering noise. The bolts were finger tight ( doh! doh ! DOH ! ) and had loosened further with the vibration. The correctly sized (OEM) spigot/CB probably saved me from losing a wheel!. I'd had several goes at unsticking a siezed caliper and had the wheel on/off several million times and being totally hacked off with the rain, dark, frustration, blowtorch burns and skinned knuckles forgot to tighten up properly.
 
I can remember an old tyre fitter aquaintence who always had a club hammer to hand. Two reasons, a stroke would frequently encourage a recalcitrant bead to drop on to the seat and a few taps on the tread from various points after pinching up wheel bolts but before torquing up to settle the nut tapers fully home. No idea if it made much difference but he argued he never had a nut come loose.
 
My daughter suffered a puncture last Sunday afternoon (in her ICE car). She has no spare and the tyre was split so gunk wouldn't fix.

She called the AA who put a spacesaver on and accompanied her to a Kwikfit to be robbed. I've no idea whether they used spigots or what but they can't have a spacesaver in every size.

I suppose that's no guarantee of safety but I doubt the AA would do it if it was really that dangerous. Of course, it depends to some extent how you drive it....
 
I can remember an old tyre fitter aquaintence who always had a club hammer to hand. Two reasons, a stroke would frequently encourage a recalcitrant bead to drop on to the seat and a few taps on the tread from various points after pinching up wheel bolts but before torquing up to settle the nut tapers fully home. No idea if it made much difference but he argued he never had a nut come loose.
Yes, these old characters made life interesting. We had a local mechanic "Dirty Davy" who used to make cut-n-shuts to order and had a mountain of the proper old McEwans beercans which he used to fix rusty cills and bond bits of car together. I had a mini, or rather two half minis ( now that's what I call penny pinching ), from Dirty Davy. After a few months, "Angela","Susan",Penny" and other scantily clad ladies started to emerge through through the peeling brown paint on the cills. In those days, I was more concerned about the backside of the car falling off. A single wheel falling off ? - luxury !
 
My daughter suffered a puncture last Sunday afternoon (in her ICE car). She has no spare and the tyre was split so gunk wouldn't fix.

She called the AA who put a spacesaver on and accompanied her to a Kwikfit to be robbed. I've no idea whether they used spigots or what but they can't have a spacesaver in every size.

I suppose that's no guarantee of safety but I doubt the AA would do it if it was really that dangerous. Of course, it depends to some extent how you drive it....
Probably not dangerous at all. The AA guy would'nt do anything daft like using the wrong nuts and he'd have secured the wheel properly with or without spigot rings. I think issues would typically only arise where maybe someone buys an old wheel of fleabay without the right knowledge and uses the wrong nuts/bolts to secure the wheel, or has the wrong offset or some other technical aspect out of kilter, maybe causing fouling on the brake/hub/arch.
 
My daughter suffered a puncture last Sunday afternoon (in her ICE car). She has no spare and the tyre was split so gunk wouldn't fix.

She called the AA who put a spacesaver on and accompanied her to a Kwikfit to be robbed. I've no idea whether they used spigots or what but they can't have a spacesaver in every size.

I suppose that's no guarantee of safety but I doubt the AA would do it if it was really that dangerous. Of course, it depends to some extent how you drive it....
The breakdown companies have specially designed wheels for this and also use wobble bolts (as far as I'm aware from talking to our garage about this some time ago).

They are of course speed limited and the driver must follow the customer to the tyre place or home (where they can then take the wheel to a garage on behalf of the customer), before removing the temporary wheel.
 
My daughter suffered a puncture last Sunday afternoon (in her ICE car). She has no spare and the tyre was split so gunk wouldn't fix.

She called the AA who put a spacesaver on and accompanied her to a Kwikfit to be robbed. I've no idea whether they used spigots or what but they can't have a spacesaver in every size.

I suppose that's no guarantee of safety but I doubt the AA would do it if it was really that dangerous. Of course, it depends to some extent how you drive it....
The problem is how did have a space saver with the right PCD/stud count?, they can’t carry them all. The normal process would be to dolly tow with two good tyres on the back( assuming FWD).
 
As I said above, they use a special wheel and wobble bolts. Details here if you're interested...

Hi again 0zzie don’t know why this pop up I have only just seen this about this type of universal spare wheel looks very good just wish I had known about it before I got the MG one as these appear to cover anything I might buy in the future MG5 kit came in around £245 I think it was but no idea what these would cost have you?
Les
 
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There have been a few different “universal” spare solutions over the years. I can remember one that had spiral slots that involved rotating the wheel on the hub to get the right pcd aligned with special washers under the bolts/nuts.

Harking back to the insurance issue the recovery company will be covered for their use, would your insurance do so?
 
Having been a service engineer for the last 20years I will always opt for a spare wheel if possible!
Luckily called Charles Warner in Lincoln this morning and they actually keep a couple of the MG5 spare wheel kits in stock!
So £277.14 lighter and a spare wheel kit all installed.
Expensive but from past experiences with AA patrol saying he couldn't tow me to a garage and having a shredded tyre well worth it!
 

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I have a LR5 on order. Just joined site. At one time I had an F Pace, as my daughter was in charge of Jaguar Special Vehicle Operations. It was offered with full size alloy spare wheel for just £250, which I ordered. Problem was when It arrived the boot had a large bump in it which was hopeless for our dogs. The dealer was good and supplied me with a boot floor for space saver free of charge but could not supply a space saver on similar terms. What a problem it was to find a wheel and tyre separately. The Jaguar F pace forum was no help. This forum has been a revelation. Thanks to all for your writings. I just wish some people would read previous posts before they ask a question that has been answered already. I have read all posts with interest thanks again.
 
Have you been looking for a full size spare for you MG5 LR? If you put the boot floor on the upper level then a full size should fit ok.
 
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